Burgundy Corton Vergennes Grand Cru

The Maison Aegerter, located in Nuit-Saint-Georges, Côte-d’Or, is thriving in a region known for both its traditions and its innovations. The Aegerters believe that nature cannot be hurried. It must be listened to and pampered. All the vintages, from the most accessible to the most exceptional, have one thing in common: they are the outcome of a resolutely modern vision and dynamic. The best of Burgundy’s terroirs is well worth it. These passionate people are daring enough to leave the beaten track and offer all consumers, beginners and experts alike, carefully picked selections, new blends and different bottles.

This is a production and trading company whose hallmark is creativity. This characteristic, passed on down the generations, is in the Aergerter DNA. Like father, like son. The Chromatiques range is also available for the Aligoté, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

Appellation
Corton Vergennes Grand Cru
The extensive area covered by this appellation Grand Cru and the large number of different Climats it contains explain the observable differences in character among the wines grown here. The Hill of Corton lies in the midst of a cluster of famous wine-growing villages - Ladoix-Serrigny, Aloxe-Corton, Pernand-Vergelesses and Savigny-lès-Beaune - with, to the North, the southern end of the Côte de Nuits where vineyards mingle with stone quarries (Comblanchien limestone). The vineyards lie at heights of 250-330 metres and form a kind of amphitheatre not found elsewhere in the Côte. The Hill of Corton produces white Corton-Charlemagne and (mainly) red Corton, described by Camille Rodier as “le roi des bons-vivants” (or “the king of the bon vivants”). Corton Grand Cru received its AOC status on 31 July, 1937. A small quantity of white wine is grown but only the reds have the right to add the name of their Climat to that of the appellation. Exposure is South-East/South-West (not an arrangement frequently found in the Côte). The hillside offers a text-book cut-away illustration of the local geology. The Oxfordian Jurassic limestone lying between Ladoix and Meursault is younger (145 million years) here than elsewhere along the Côte. At mid-slope the gradient is gentle and the soil reddish and pebbly, derived from brown limestone and rich deposits of marl with high potassium content. The Pinot Noir grape is pampered here. The Chardonnay grape (which gives us the Corton- Charlemagne) occupies the top of the slope.
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